Michael Bayle
GM of Global Monetization for Yahoo! Connected Life
Yahoo!
@roppongit

Michael Bayle is the GM of Global Monetization for Yahoo! Connected Life. He is responsible for leading the global monetization strategy for Connected Life products, including Mobile, PC Desktop clients, and TV. This effort includes leading a cross-company, cross-functional team to devise business, product and channel strategies to support indirect revenue initiatives. Bayle is also a Board member of the Mobile Marketing Association and co-chairs the sub-committee on mobile advertising guidelines.

Yahoo! Connected Life encompasses the company’s mobile products, broadband services, digital home initiative, PC client experience and strategic partnerships including AT&T, BT, Nokia and Motorola. This includes the new Yahoo! Go suite of services, a revolutionary way to seamlessly connect users to their favorite Web services, wherever they happen to be.

Bayle joined the organization in September 2002 to lead business development for some of Yahoo! Search Marketing’s largest global partners including MSN and ESPN. He also played a key role in launching Yahoo! Search Marketing’s mobile sponsored search trials in Japan in 2004, and in the US in 2005.

No stranger to the Internet, Bayle has been working in the sector for over 11 years. He began his career as Director of Business Development at IDG, creating one of the Internet’s first affiliate programs and playing an instrumental role in the direction of the Webby Awards. Next, he became one of the earliest employees at LinkExchange before the company was acquired by Microsoft in 1998. At Microsoft, he was the International Business Development Manager, negotiating partnerships with large OEMs, telecommunications companies, and leading portals in overseas markets to distribute the bCentral brand and product offerings. Before coming to Yahoo!, he held a Senior Business Development Director position for a start-up company specializing in international e-commerce.

Michael holds a Bachelor of Arts in Japanese, a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, and his Masters degree in Computer Science from Stanford University.